I'm Josh Goebel, the creator of Pastie, Invoicie, and Snag the Flag. I make a living writingam a Rails pro and also dabble in photography and other geek stuff.

Running Blind

running blind... we are all running blind.

This is Running Blind. Enjoy.  

I'm Josh Goebel, the creator of Pastie, Invoicie, and Snag the Flag. I make a living writing Rails and also dabble in photography and other geek stuff.
Ask me anything

September

Tue
30

Well, that’s rude. Just can’t make this stuff up.

Tue
30

Whoosh

Whoosh helps you send out lots of emails using the Amazon Simple Email Service. Whoosh will import mailing list in CSV or Tab-Delimited format from a file, or direct from a remote URL.

Why use Whoosh and Amazon SES? It’s cheaper than alternatives such as MailChimp, like, a lot cheaper.

Wow. Didn’t know Amazon had also changed the pricing dynamics of the mass email market as well.

Tue
30

Just sad. Makes me kind of proud I dropped out of college in a weird way.

September

Mon
29

Retina iMacs in late testing, could launch soon

I wasn’t ever planning to buy an iMac again, but if a fancy Retina iMac drops from the sky later this year, it’s going to be an awfully tough decision.

Agreed. I’m in the same boat on this.

Mon
29

Technology and Trees: The Sculpture of Roxy Paine

The reality-jarring experience is surprising in more ways than the material. The scene is reproduced in forced perspective – a technique often used on stage sets to drastically increase the perception of depth. In this case, what appears to be an 80-foot deep room is compressed into only 18 feet. Everything, from the vents to the poles get incrementally smaller as they move back in space.

I’d love to see this in person.

Mon
29
Lots of people like to be seeking God, but not too many want to actually get there.

September

Sun
28

FBI and Police Departments Endorse Apple's Full Device Encryption

Gruber:

“Apple will become the phone of choice for the pedophile,” said John J. Escalante, chief of detectives for Chicago’s police department. “The average pedophile at this point is probably thinking, I’ve got to get an Apple phone.”

Well, that didn’t take long. An even stronger endorsement. The pedophile card is pretty much the last resort for these law enforcement types who feel entitled to the content of our digital devices. Fear mongering with bogeymen and an appeal to base emotions.

Not everyone who wants privacy is a criminal… and just because there are some bad people in the world doesn’t mean the rest of us aren’t entitled to privacy.

September

Sat
27
Sat
27

Nope - Live Free

We started this project because we volunteer with students who use digital camera enabled devices. The shocking truth is that just about anyone can hack into your computer and turn on the camera without you even knowing it. The only way to guarantee your privacy is to cover the camera when you are not using it.

Don’t honestly feel like I need this (and think there might be a small amount of fear mongering going on there), but interesting idea never the less.

Sat
27

New on Netflix USA: "Stardust"

To win his true love’s heart, wide-eyed Tristan Thorn journeys to a forbidden realm to retrieve a fallen star that has taken human form.

Best. Movie. Ever. Easily in my top 10. Glad to see it on Netflix (though it’s also one of the few movies I actually own).

September

Fri
26

Facebook offers more details on its internet-beaming planes

Speaking with Mashable CEO Pete Cashmore, Maguire said that the UAVs would need to be able to fly for months, or even years, at an altitude “above the weather, above all airspace.” For those counting, that’s around 60,000 to 90,000 feet. Luckily for Facebook and the Internet.org initiative, it has already looked into solar-powered options that can make trips lasting up to five years. Maguire went on to say that a regular-sized drone won’t suffice, so the “planes” will have to be “roughly the size of a commercial aircraft, like a 747.” As you might expect, the effort is certain to face regulatory hurdles, including how many of the vehicles a single pilot can oversee. Eventually, the goal is to have one person steering “up to 100” of the internet-carrying planes at a time.

Am I getting old? Does this sound crazy to anyone else?

Fri
26

India put a satellite in orbit around Mars for a fraction of what NASA spent

India can rightly feel proud of itself today as its Mangalyaan “MOM” satellite mission successfully entered orbit around Mars. In the process, the country has broken at least three records, including being the first Asian nation to reach the red planet and being the first country to get to Mars on the first attempt. Third on that list of achievements is that the project is one of the cheapest exploration projects in recent history, costing just $72 million — pocket change compared to NASA’s $670 million MAVEN probe and the $2 billion Curiosity Rover. India’s Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, has even quipped that it cost less to launch the satellite than it cost to make the movie Gravity.

Impressive. What are we doing so wrong?

September

Thu
25
Not good enough to be your second phone? Ouch.

Gruber  

September

Wed
24

The Dropbox terabyte conundrum

The original concept of Dropbox—and it’s right there in the name—is that there’s a spot on your computer where you can drop files, and it’ll automatically sync with other devices that are connected to the same Dropbox account. And all the while, the files are still on your drive, not hosted over a slow Internet connection.

Over the years you’ve been able to share specific folders with other Dropbox users, offer downloads of files to people who don’t use the service, and the like. But at its core, Dropbox has always been a tool that made a small part of your filesystem—~/Dropbox unless you were really stubborn or foolish—into something more.

So, that terabyte of cloud storage is great. But did you know that there’s only one Mac whose default configuration features more than one terabyte of storage? (For the record, it’s the Mac mini server, which features two 1TB drives.) I’ve got a MacBook Air that’s got maxed-out storage, but even my drive only holds about half a terabyte.

Very good points. I think the problem with non-synced shared storage over the Internet is that it would be too slow for most users with anything other than tiny files.

And most OSes I’ve used have never been good at accessing large files remotely when mounted on a remote volume… the expectation has always seems to be that the remote connection should be “fast enough”. Honestly when you click to open a large file you’d need a progress bar, etc… i.e., large files remotely need to act more like downloads than a filesystem. (at least until things are much faster)